Bike Lanes May Be The Most Cost-Effective Way To Improve Public Health | Co.Exist | ideas + impact

a start!!!

Amazing things happen to a city once people are encouraged to switch to bike commuting: the air quality improves throughout the city, which benefits everyone, not just cyclists. Quieter roads are more pleasant roads to be around, and they’re less congested for those who still insist on driving. And of course riding a bike every day brings all kinds of health benefits to the cyclists themselves.A new study from researchers at Columbia University‚Äôs Mailman School of Public Health shows just how big those benefits can be. Per dollar spent, constructing bike lanes is a cheap way to improve public health. For instance back in 2005, New York City spent $10 million on curbing traffic as part of the federally-funded Safe Routes to School program. Sidewalks were widened, bike lanes constructed, and traffic lights re-phased to suit pedestrians. The “net societal benefit” of these changes? The study’s authors estimate it to be $230 million.

Source: Bike Lanes May Be The Most Cost-Effective Way To Improve Public Health | Co.Exist | ideas + impact

A Giant Japanese Toilet Company Is Making A Toilet For The 2.5 Billion People Who Lack One | Co.Exist | ideas + impact

The Japanese toilet giant Lixil counts brands like Grohe and American Standard in its portfolio, and it’s known for fancy, automated johns that some compare to iPhones for engineering quality. But it’s the SaTo (“Safe Toilet”) division of the company that could have the widest impact in the world.SaTo is the name of a low-cost toilet first developed with American Standard, with financial support from the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation. Designed for parts of the world where there are no sewer systems, the SaTo has sold more than 1 million units so far, encouraging Lixil to think bigger. It’s now turning SaTo into its own division, with a mission to spread cheap-but-effective toilets to the 2.5 billion in the world who still lack them.

Source: A Giant Japanese Toilet Company Is Making A Toilet For The 2.5 Billion People Who Lack One | Co.Exist | ideas + impact