A Floating Food Forest In New York City | Modern Cities

New York’s ‘barge-to-table’ floating farm gives city residents without access to farmland the opportunity to pick their own food. As a successful demonstration at Brooklyn Bridge Park comes to end later this week, Mary Mattingly has shed light on an obscure New York City law that prohibits the growing of food on public land, and demonstrated that edible perennial landscapes can help solve food insecurity problems in even the harshest of urban settings.Swale is a public floating food forest built atop a 5,000 square foot barge, currently docked at Brooklyn Bridge Park’s Pier 6. Founded in 2016 by artist Mary Mattingly, Swale allows visitors to harvest herbs, fruits and vegetables for free. The project began as an idea to advocate for food to be grown on some of the 30,000 acres of public land in New York City. Although NYC boasts over 100 acres of community garden space, the City has more than 30,000 acres of park space. Picking one’s own food is illegal on New York City public land, so Mattingly banded together a team of stakeholders to construct a dense garden of edible plants atop a barge- which is technically legal due to a loophole created by waterway common law.

Source: A Floating Food Forest In New York City | Modern Cities

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London’s ‘Super Sewer’ Finally Underway To Help Stop Waste Flowing Into Thames : News : TravelersToday

Workers have started the construction of London’s “super sewer” in an effort to reduce the waste that goes into the Thames river. The project’s goal is to address the waste problem that the city has especially with its growing population. Currently, a hole is being dug at the new tunnel’s center.According to City A.M., workers from Tideway have started digging a 30-meter diameter hole to mark the new tunnel’s central point. The hole is as big as the dome at St Paul’s Cathedral while the tunnel has a length of 16 miles.Just this year, about 1.2 million tons of sewage waste has been dumped straight into the Thames river due to the fact that the old Victorian sewers can’t handle the huge amount of waste that flows through it. BBC reported that the old tunnels’ waste would overflow to the river even if it would just rain for a few millimeters.The proposal for the Thames Tideway Tunnel isn’t a recent one because it has been floating in the air since 2005. However, there were some issues that needed to be clarified with regards to the contracts so the go-signal for the project’s construction was given on February 2015.

Source: London’s ‘Super Sewer’ Finally Underway To Help Stop Waste Flowing Into Thames : News : TravelersToday

The Swedish-Inspired Way American Cities Are Trying to End Pedestrian Deaths

Shirley Gonzales made no secret of her views on transportation when she ran for the San Antonio City Council in 2013. She laid them out in her answer to a questionnaire: “pedestrians first, followed by cycling, public transportation and private automobiles, in that order.” Gonzales promoted this agenda even though she was running in a city where fewer than 2 percent of commuters walk to work.A few months later, after she’d won the election, the tales of some of her constituents drove the issue home. Most prominent was the story of Sharon Ledesma, a 28-year-old single mother who was crossing a four-lane street one night when a car switched lanes and veered toward her and her two children. Ledesma managed to push the children out of the way. Dominic, who was 11 at the time, and Mallory, who was 8, survived but had serious injuries. Both had broken bones and were on crutches for weeks. Ledesma, however, did not make it. She was declared brain dead at the hospital. The next day, after her kids had a chance to say goodbye, her family took her off life support.Gonzales began to hear from other San Antonio families. The city had one of the highest pedestrian death rates in the country. In fact, 373 pedestrians had died in the metropolitan area over the previous decade. And Gonzales’ own district, largely poor and Hispanic, had some of the most dangerous streets, especially Culebra Road, the arterial where Ledesma died. That four-lane road shares many of the characteristics of other deadly stretches for pedestrians: Cars traveling near the speed limit of 40 mph pass between modest homes and retail outlets, while pedestrians walk along sidewalks separated from the traffic by only a low curb for as much as half a mile between crosswalks.

Source: The Swedish-Inspired Way American Cities Are Trying to End Pedestrian Deaths

Article: Harvesting fog to solve a water crisis

Harvesting fog to solve a water crisis

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