7 Cities That Are Starting To Go Car-Free

7 Cities That Are Starting To Go Car-Free

Urban planners are finally recognizing that streets should be designed for people, not careening hunks of deadly metal.

After over a hundred years of living with cars, some cities are slowly starting to realize that the automobile doesn’t make a lot of sense in the urban context. It isn’t just the smog or the traffic deaths; in a city, cars aren’t even a convenient way to get around.Traffic in London today moves slower than an average cyclist (or a horse-drawn carriage). Commuters in L.A. spend 90 hours a year stuck in traffic. A U.K. study found that drivers spend 106 days of their lives looking for parking spots.Now a growing number of cities are getting rid of cars in certain neighborhoods through fines, better design, new apps, and, in the case of Milan, even paying commuters to leave their car parked at home and take the train instead.Unsurprisingly, the changes are happening fastest in European capitals that were designed hundreds or thousands of years before cars were ever built. In sprawling U.S. suburbs that were designed for driving, the path to eliminating cars is obviously more challenging. (And a few car-loving cities, like Sydney, Australia, are going in the other direction, and taking away pedestrian space on some downtown streets so there’s more room for cars).Here are a handful of the leaders moving toward car-free neighborhoods.

Source: 7 Cities That Are Starting To Go Car-Free

These RFID Tags Allow Danish Cyclists To Turn Traffic Lights Green

These RFID Tags Allow Danish Cyclists To Turn Traffic Lights

GreenSorry, cars: The bike always gets to go first.

It really must be heaven to be a cyclist in Denmark. You get lovely, dedicated infrastructure, like this new bridge. You get cities that run analyses showing how bikes are good for people, and cars aren’t. And now, if you live in Aarhus, you can get a special tag to help beat the traffic lights.Aarhus, Denmark’s second largest city, is currently running a trial where cyclists are given RFID tags that they attach to their wheels. As they approach a junction, the tag sends a signal to a nearby reader, which in turn switches the light to green. Cyclists never even have to stop, even as car drivers on the other side of the junction are brought to a standstill.

Source: These RFID Tags Allow Danish Cyclists To Turn Traffic Lights Green

4 New Renderings Imagine Scaffolding as Beautiful Installations – CityLab

Construction sheds—what most regular city folks call scaffolding—cover some 200 miles of New York City sidewalk, infecting the metropolis with dark green boards and unnerving shadows. For the most part, construction sheds are both monotonous and everywhere, which is why the New York Building Congress launched a competition last summer to redesign them completely.And the results are in! A committee of real estate, architecture, and construction specialists, including a top official in the city’s Department of Design and Construction, have reviewed 33 construction shed proposals and selected four winners. The designs will be evaluated by the New York City Department of Buildings for code compliance, according to Commissioner Rick Chandler, and could be used by city developers in the future

 

Source: 4 New Renderings Imagine Scaffolding as Beautiful Installations – CityLab